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 September 2017

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Ark
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Wed Sep 27, 2017 3:33 pm

RICK:
Good start on the trip! wavy Did you pack any PB&J? Drool Keep on posting!popcorn

ELLEN :
Still summer here, 86 today, but 71 on Friday. I look forward to the 70s, but sure don't want any colder for a long time.

I had a lesson on mostly Ivan yesterday. I gave blood on Monday and haven't been feeling too perky, so didn't ride Areion much on Tuesday. ( The lady taking my blood did a wonderful, pain-free, job. Last time I got jabbed repeatedly and they never did find my vein. This new lady, Dee, got it in one stick. ) :dance:
Anyway, our lesson went well. We found some training issues with Areion and obstacles that we will have to work on, but she ended up doing everything we wanted. She needs some work on things around her feet and things bouncing around unexpectedly. I accidentally dropped a board on Ivan's rump when we were going in a circle around a barrel with it and he jumped about 2 feet, and settled right down. Areion would have died, or killed us, if it had happened to her. So Areion will have some new lessons.

I am off to take Spookette, our 3-legged/ $6 million cat, back to the vet. She just can't get over her sinus/respiratory problem.
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Rick Angell

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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Wed Sep 27, 2017 5:52 pm

LOL!! NO, ARK ... we did not do the PB&J routine on this trip ... woulda ended up feeding the whole bus full of people!! ROFL

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August 12 … Day two

After a quick breakfast, we all met and boarded our coach at 8:30AM. We were on the second coach parked on the street as there was another Holiday Vacation tour group there also. We quickly became the “red tour” and the other group was the “yellow tour”. (Both tour guides knew each other well and there were a lot of humorous quips back and forth between the guides.) Our driver for the day was Kevin. He is a high school science teacher and was able to share a lot of good information about the history and geology of the area and he was FUNNY!! He was also a darn good driver of that coach. (Even though I never drove a coach, I’m a retired commercial truck driver …. 18 wheeler … with nearly 1.75 million miles. I have a special admiration and appreciation for a “good driver” and I let Kevin know that at the end of the day.)

Our sightseeing highlights today included (1) Bird Point on the Turnagain Arm, (2) Girdwood Bakery, (3) Mt. Alyeska Tram, (4) an “included lunch”, (5) the Alaskan Wildlife Conservation Center. (6) an unplanned roadside stop to see salmon on their trip upstream to spawn.

Unfortunately, we were pestered all day with light rain on and off and fog and a heavy atmosphere of varying density but we traveled on and just accepted that not all days could be bright and sunny,

The 50 mile fjord was given the unusual name of TURNAGAIN ARM by the explorer Capt. James Cook in 1778. He had been trying to find a sea route to the Northwest Passage and had to “turn again” when he found there was no outlet. The view from the top of Mt. Alyeska includes the fjord, the Kenai and Chugach Mountains as well as the forrests of Chugach State Park. This has some typical views that we saw as well as a bit of info. Note … we did NOT see the hotel, but it obviously was somewhere along that stretch of the Seward Highway. https://onelongdrive.net/turnagain-arm/ An interesting factoid from our science teacher, Kevin was that the tide there would rise / fall nearly 20 ft. and the big Alaskan earthquake of 1964 affected the topography.

Always interested in something sweet to eat, I was happy when we stopped at The Bake Shop (est. 1973), Girdwood, Alaska. Since our breakfast at the Hilton tomorrow morning was NOT included, Diane encouraged us to make our sweets purchase for breakfast here. Most of the group bought huge cinnamon rolls to take with us (complete with a huge slab of butter!!). While Carol did the deed on purchasing goodies to eat, I stayed outside and marveled at ALL the colorful flowers hanging around the place. Personally, I don’t ever remember seeing any orange flowers before. See if you can find some orange flowers (or YOUR favorite color … maybe blue) while thinking about some of the baked creations inside.
https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g31000-d532491-r471513045-The_Bake_Shop-Girdwood_Anchorage_Alaska.html

Here is a wikipedia listing that tells more about Girdwood and how the entire town was moved after the 1964 earthquake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girdwood,_Anchorage


There is a resort hotel in Girdwood and also a tram lift up the mountainside for skiers. At the top facility of the tram is a nice restaurant and that is where we had an included lunch. We weren’t rushed in eating a nice meal, but were reminded that the “yellow tour group” was right behind us and waiting for us to finish. We were all served the same dish … a nice cut of steak along with fish (not salmon) and finished with a delicious fruit tart for dessert. There maybe more pictures here than you want to see, but look at the first few for the restaurant and the tram.
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=tram+lift+and+restaurant+girdwood+alaska&qpvt=tram+lift+and+restaurant+girdwood+alaska

Our visit at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center was informative and impressive about the needs of the varied wildlife living there. “The mission of the 200 acre AWCC is to provide refuge for orphaned, injured, and ill animals that can not survivr in the wilderness. If an animal can not be returned to the wild, it is given a permanent home here.” AWCC website. People that want to go to Alaska, generally want to see a lot of varied wildlife. That doesn’t happen always as sometimes it is just the luck of the draw. So, in its own way, this Conservation Center was an opportunity to see a great many different animals in a reasonably natural setting. Of course, there were some that were caged, but in humane conditions … especially birds such as Adonis, the Bald Eagle (that had been shot and only had one wing), Snappy, the great horned owl that was also a gunshot victim in 1999, and Chena, the lynx who faces a daily struggle to survive after being kept in a very small cage for a long time (many years..??).

From a more cheerful standpoint, there is a growing herd of Woods Bison and some will be reintroduced to the wild. These are slightly larger than the Plains Bison ( isn’t everything LARGER in Alaska..?? lol!!) of the “lower 48”. This herd is the only herd of Woods Bison in the US and started in 2003 with 13 animals and now has approx. 135. They were on the extinction list for 17 years.

We also saw some elk, both grizzly and brown bear, and Snickers the porcupine. We were on an elevated viewing walkway and watched the bears playing in the water and using a tree for a good old back scratching. Be prepared for a big chuckle watching this Snickers video. He is absolutely adorable !!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5I5H7EeC8k

We’ve probably all heard of the howling of wolves … and maybe have heard our own canines tip their head back and howl. There were three Gray wolves there and in response to the sound of a siren out on the highway the male started howling and soon had the two females howling also. It was a mournful, eerie sound to my ears.

Here is the website you’ll find interesting: https://www.alaskawildlife.org/animals/ Very near the top, you’ll find a dark brown strip with “visit” being the first choice. Click on this for a drop down menu, choose “animals” and then scroll down to a grid of animal pictures. You can then click on each animal and it will tell you that animal’s “story” including a bit about Snickers.

On the return trip to the Hilton, Kevin took us on his version of a downtown tour of Anchorage. My “sense of direction” was seriously flawed as I had no idea which direction was north. This was because of the cloudy and semi-foggy conditions all day long.!! I rested while Carol and our friends went out to find a whale mural on the side of a building that was visible from our hotel room. She then found … “5 blocks away”... a large, three story tall … sculpture of “The Last Blue Whale” that was made in 1973. It depicted the blue whale diving and its flukes (tail) upsetting a couple of boats with three whalers on the surface of the water. The whale’s expression seems to say it is pleased with itself. Here you’ll find a “whale” of a lot of pictures of the mural: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=whale+mural+on+side+of+building+anchorage+alaska&qpvt=whale+mural+on+side+of+building+anchorage+alaska Also, you will find more whale pictures here, but the first few are of the statue: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=statue+the+last+blue+whale+anchorage+alaska&id=F0C35E575AFF95F7D6C3616D6320A216A6B2B188&FORM=IQFRBA

Dinner was at the Hard Rock Cafe, Anchorage and gave us another lesson in how expensive it is to eat in Alaska.

Its been a long, full day today and we are to board the bus at 8:30AM. Good nite !!
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Thu Sep 28, 2017 12:11 pm

August 13 … Day three

Today started off sunny with temperatures in the 60 – 65F range. We had our “luggage” (two carry-on sized pieces) ready to be picked up outside our hotel room door. We also had time to eat and enjoy the cinnamon rolls purchased yesterday. And we boarded the coach at 8:30AM and met yet another new coach driver … Larry. He was to be with us for the rest of the trip until we got to Skagway for the cruise portion of the tour. Larry was kind enough to play the song, “North to Alaska”as we headed toward Wasilla and the Iditarod Headquarters.

I think all in our group were genuinely impressed with the Iditarod Headquarters and the story behind this famous race. Carol writes in her scrapbook / journal about the significance of the race and its famous dog, Balto: “Balto and the serum run” … IN 1925, SEVERAL Inuit children in Nome, Alaska were very sick with diphtheria and an epidemic was feared. The only anti-toxin was in a hospital in Anchorage, 1000 miles away. Pack ice closed the port of Nome to ships, and a train could only take the serum to Nenana where the tracks ended. A relay of dog sled teams carried it the remaining 674 miles. Balto led his team the final 53 miles through a heavy blizzard and temperatures of -50F to deliver the serum.

“Beginning in 1973, the Iditarod Sled Dog race has been run yearly to commemorate this serum run and the role of sled dogs in Alaska’s settlement. The grueling race now covers the full 1000 miles from Anchorage to Nome.

“The heroic story of Balto touched the whole nation. The people of New York City raised funds to have a statue of Balto erected in Central Park … it is still there.”

One thing we all learned is that these dogs are not forced to run … its in their blood to want to run. They are well cared for and much loved by the mushers. During this race … and other races also … there are vets stationed about ever 10 miles or so and each dog is thoroughly examined for foot / paw issues as well as sore muscles. All dogs wear boots for protection and a team may go through a 1000 boots per race!! These dogs are well cared for … petted and babied and loved by their owners and trainers. We were supposed to be given an opportunity to pet the puppies, but Mother Nature had other wet ideas. I’ll have more to say about dogs later on.

Other than a stop for a meal, our next point of interest was the ALASKA VETERANS MEMORIAL . It is a quiet place dedicated to the rememberance of the veterans of Alaska who served their country throughout the world. There were six veterans in our tour group and we proudly recognized their contributions as we made a picture of them in front of this memorial. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Veterans_Memorial This memorial was inside the boundaries of Denali Park.

Our destination was the Denali Princess Wilderness Lodge. https://www.princesslodges.com/princess-alaska-lodges/denali-lodge/photo-gallery/ As you can see in the photos, its NOT too terribly shabby!! I do believe all of us would have enjoyed a second night here, but the costs would have been prohibitive. The grounds were lovely and well cared for and the rooms were quite comfortable. After settling in our rooms, we went to the Grizzly Bar and Grill. My burger and Carol’s fish and chips came to $43.00. Did I say already that everything is expensive in Alaska?
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Thu Sep 28, 2017 5:58 pm

SNOOP writes: "While Carol and Rick are working on her scrapbook and his writing, I thought I'd tell ya a bit about what I've learned...
Do you know why Eskimos was their clothes in Tide??
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=because its TOO COLD out tide!" ROFL ROFL ROFL
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Ark
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Thu Sep 28, 2017 10:01 pm

RICK:
ummmm....what? ROFL

That lodge sure is pretty. I could see staying there for a day or two. I would have had to buy some peanut butter, though. Food sure is expensive!


I may have lost my peahen. She got out yesterday and flew off. She hasn't returned yet and we haven't heard her. Poor hen will never make it on her own after a life of caged living.
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Graymare

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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Fri Sep 29, 2017 12:27 am

Awwwww, ARK, hope she returns..................

CB is missing in action.

God bless.
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Ellen E

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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Fri Sep 29, 2017 9:54 am

Ark, since she's used to people, she'll might land in somebody's yard and they'll wonder where in the world she came from. Check the animal shelter to see if anybody has reported seeing her.

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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Fri Sep 29, 2017 1:44 pm

Just oacking, headed to utah where hubby is building a pirch for moonlight kathy, then back to idaho, oack somemorw, off to az.with horses going with. Gkids backed out....
Passed my motorcycle test....
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Fri Sep 29, 2017 6:32 pm

August 14 … day four

Carol writes: Our LONG day began with breakfast in the theater from 4:30 to 5:15AM, and we had to have our bags outside our door before that for Larry to oad onto our coach. The coach opened at 5:15 for any incidental carry-ons. Dana Durham, the Park Ranger who would drive us through Denali National Park today, met us outside the hotel with an old (converted) school bus. We left at 5:50 for our all day Tundra Tour on the only road in the park. It is closed to private cars and large motor coaches in summer.”

“Alaska’s ATHABASCAN indians called the mountain my several names, but they all mean essentially the same thing: “The Great One”. Denali was the most common and popular of these names. However, the mountain was named (by the hubristic white invaders) “Mt, McKinley in 1896 in honor of the US President. The name stood until 2015 when President Obama officially renamed the mountain DENALI, It is north America’s highest peak at 20,320 ft.” (as of 2015, 20,310 ft….??). This taken from Insight Guides Alaska.

Now … this is MY feelings about the day. The park was rugged and wild and we did see some few animals off in the distance partly due to Dana’s keen eyes spotting them.

I don’t like school buses … they ride too hard and the seats are too cramped for my long legs. The ONLY savings grace … in my humble opinion … is that there were drop down video screens. Dana had a good video camera with a telescopic lense that was connected to the videos screens. She would periodically stop the bus and show us something via the video system. What I did NOT like about the day (other than being on a school bus) is that this woman started talking when she picked us up at the lodge and did not really cease until we returned to the lodge over 8 hours later. The road we were on is a narrow gravel road and had no guard rails and she was all over the road while driving … talking … and looking for some tiny, tiny speck of something she said was a bear, or wild sheep, or maybe a deer. I felt the bus slip a few times when she got close to the edge of the roadway. In other words … SHE SCARED ME TO DEATH ALL DAY LONG!! They really need two people on these buses … one to do nothing but drive and the other to look for wildlife and do the talking etc.

We stopped at a “rest area” in the park for a break before proceeding to our turn around area. We had gone maybe a mile when Dana stopped for some wildlife observation and somebody on the bus let us all know that there was “smoke” coming up near their window. The bus was on fire and we had to all quickly get off. Fortunately it was an electrical issue with no flames, but we couldn’t go anymore in that bus. After several two-way radio calls, there was another bus sent up from the rest area that took us back to the rest area to wait for a replacement vehicle. It was another “tour bus” and that driver just came to our rescue before collecting his group and proceeding. We had about a 90 minute wait before the replacement bus arrived and we were all ready to return to the lodge. NO!! Dana continued on (over our protests) to make sure we got the whole package tour before returning to the lodge. We were NOT happy.

Explore this website for some pics or the park and some animals: https://www.nps.gov/dena/index.htm You’ll see some spectacular scenery here … and it WAS spectacular when the clouds or fog lifted briefly: https://www.nationalparks.org/explore-parks/denali-national-park-and-preserve

After the wild experience on the Tundra Tour, we were all pleased to see Larry and that beautiful, luxurious, motor coach. It felt almost like a castle on wheels. We still had 135 miles to go to Fairbanks. Included in out itinerary for the day was a stop off at the “Salmon Bake”. The food was grilled outside but due to a light rain / mist we ate inside. The entry to this was made like a mine tunnel. The food was good and especially the desserts. We didn’t see the theater program, but the little video on this site shows a bit of what this place does. Filling meal: http://www.alaska.org/detail/alaska-salmon-bake

After our filling meal, Larry took us to the Westmark Fairbanks Hotel that would be our home for two nights.

When we arrived at the Westmark, one of our Vietnam vets looked ghastly as he and his wife got off of the coach. He sat on a bench near the door and two of the other vets who had EMT training assessed Jim. After the rest of us went to our rooms on the third floor, Jim and Jean came up with the two vets to the room next to ours and found that someone else (not with our group) already had their room. They came to our room where RC called the desk to ask for another room for Jim and was told they could have room 736. Jean was very apprehensive about being four floors away from friends, so Carol went to the desk with RC and Diane. Carol asked if we could give Jim and Jean our room and that we would take 736.. This turned out to be a good solution. It seemed even more so to our benefit as the new room was a mini-suite. We were also able to do a bit of laundry in the sink of the kitchen portion of the suite.

(The next morning, Jean would tell us that Jim has PTSD and having to get off of the smoking bus made him think he was going to die. He was able to sleep and felt much better the next day. Also, Jean soon found out that there were several sets of eyes watching over Jim for the balance of the trip. After that, I found several excuses to sit and visit with Jim … he talked about his military service and I was “watching” him.)

This was a tiring day and fortunately we could sleep in as we were told to be ready to board the coach at 9:50 the next morning.

ZZZZzzzz!!
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Sat Sep 30, 2017 12:29 am


RICK:
Whew! I am exhausted just reading about that day! affraid

CB:
Travel safe!

ELLEN and GRAYMARE:
No sign of the peahen. She flew down the hill away from neighbors, toward the woods, creek and lower hayfield. She isn't tame like a parrot or pet chicken, she won't go to a person. If we are lucky she will come back to the sound of the peacock, who we got to yell this evening by whistling with grass between our thumbs. Unfortunately, she isn't the brightest creature. She flew over the fence behind the barn and probably will have problems crossing back over it. She is about 15 years old and I hatched her and the peacock in an incubator and raised them in my horse trailer for 6 months. They have no 'street smarts'. Sad

Spookette, the cat, got her teeth cleaned and checked for abscesses to see if that was causing her recurring sinus infections. Nope. She got a different antibiotic. I hope it works.

This weekend is dedicated to trimming horse feet.


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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Sat Sep 30, 2017 6:25 am

Hi gang. It's been a long busy week here in PA. The weather was so hot, where is fall? Our grass looks like it usually look in July, brown and crunchy.

Monday was a extra busy day, spend the morning taking down every Steeler item in our house, my walls are bare. LOL A PTSD attack in action. What a mess the NFL has made by dissing the Veterans, and our flag. Evil or Very Mad No more football in this house.

Then off to the Military Order of the Purple Heat meeting/dinner. Weds 2 Barnabas meetings, Thursday another Barnabas team meeting, Friday I painted. Yes time has come to paint the trim on the lower level windows. Today I'll be back at it.

RICK: My heart breaks for Jean & Jim. A PTSD attack away from home around strangers can be a extremely taxing situation for all. Especially people who don't know anything about it. God bless them.

CB: Safe travel my friend. You are missing the Bloomsburg Fair. It has been so hot the attendance is down this year.

Have a wonderful weekend everyone.
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Sat Sep 30, 2017 9:28 am

Trudy, I'm with you. Until the NFL decides to do the right thing, I won't be watching football either. Yes, they have the right to kneel, but just because they can doesn't mean they should. What really ticks me off is that they have a 'game book' that specifically states approved behavior for the flag and anthem. Kaepernick should have been suspended and fined when he did it the first time, according to their own rules.
It really made me mad when the one Steeler who did the right thing was shamed into apologizing for not supporting team unity.
Just give me Sunday afternoon football with NO politics.

Fall is definitely here. It was 45° overnight. I turned on the fireplace when I got up this morning. It is a beautiful 'crystal' morning here. Clear and bright.
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Sun Oct 01, 2017 10:20 am

August 15 … Day five

We actually got to sleep in a bit late this morning and had breakfast at 8:00AM in the hotel dining room.

As we were leaving the dining room, we noticed a small table beside the dining entrance that was formally set up and had a single chair tipped forward in a “reserved position”.  Across the plate was an American Flag in the triangular folded manner designated for a deceased military person. Also on the table was a Bible, a single red rose in a bud vase with a red ribbon, and a card with the following explanation.

“The table is round – to show our everlasting concern.

“The cloth is white – symbolizing the purity of their motives when answering the call to service.

“The single red rose reminds us of the lives of these Americans, and their loved ones and friends who keep the faith, while seeking answers.

“The red ribbon symbolizes our continued determination to account for them.

“A slice of lemon reminds us of the bitter fate of those captured and missing in a foreign land.

“A pinch of salt symbolizes the tears of our missing and their families who long for answers after decades of uncertainty.

“The lighted candle reflects our hope for their return – alive or dead.

“The Bible represents the strength gained through faith in our country, founded as one nation under God, to sustain those lost from our midst.

“The glass is inverted – to symbolize their inability to share a toast.

“The chairs are empty – they are missing. “

(I’ve searched for a web based photo of this, but am unable to locate one.)

We boarded the coach at 9:50 to go see an informative display and presentation about the Alyesko (Alaskan) Pipe Line … The Gold Dredge #8 … and  a cruise on a riverboat on the Chena River.

At the pipeline, we were able to see a cut out cross section of the pipeline and a couple of the  “pigs” used in the movement of the petroleum through the line. One pig is used to separate the products being transferred by the line and then there was a “smart pig” that is periodically used to detect and clean out any impurities.  This is done about every 12 – 14 days or sooner if needed.

The narrator of the pipeline presentation then took us on an open car train ride that wound through a small tract of land.  There were several stops along the way where we could see different facets of the history of “gold dredging” and he got off at several of the stops to demonstrate the equipment.  At one of the stops, several folk stepped up to the cars and demonstrated the process of “panning for gold”.  Also, we would have the opportunity to actually do some gold panning for ourselves.  “… the RUSH is on!! “.  Here you’ll learn a bit more about our day:   https://www.travelalaska.com/Partners/GoldDredge8/Displays/17DO30_Fairbanks.aspx   As we got off the little train, we were each handed a small leather bag of soil / dirt and shown to an area that had rows of benches facing a water trough where we could start our panning. This will give you a few more photos :  https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=gold+dredge+%238+fairbanks+alaska&qpvt=gold+dredge+%238+fairbanks+alaska

So, we did do some panning for gold and between us we had just pennies less than $25.00 worth of gold flecks collected.  We combined our treasure and Carol had a pair of earrings made showcasing the gold flecks.  That cost us $30.00 !!  I got amused at the guide when we boarded the train for a ride back to the parking lot. He asked: “Do any of you gents actually have the gold you panned?  Show of hands please. I see three hands up, so you guys are ‘single’.”  Yes … the rush is on!!  It turned out to be a fun experience.  LOL!!

After the “rigorous” task of panning for gold we re-boarded the coach and Larry drove us to Steamboat Landing for an ‘included’ lunch before we were to board the Riverboat Discovery.  Lunch was miner’s stew, roasted veggies, rolls, and dessert and it was all served family style.  The wait staff kept our tea glasses full and brought any needed extras like rolls, etc. I have a gut feeling that there were probably in excess of 1000 folk in that dining room at one time and the staff made pleasant quick work of serving such a large crowd. This may explain a bit more about what kind of fun experience we had on this riverboat even though it was misty raining part of the time.  BTW, plastic ponchos were passed out to help keep folk dry.  Be SURE to see the short video in this site.  You dog lovers be prepared for a big dose of puppy love and cuteness:
http://riverboatdiscovery.com/

Shortly after boarding the paddle-wheeler for the river cruise … and getting started … we were surprised that a small float plane “buzzed” the boat a couple times and then landed alongside us on the river. It was after this that the announcer aboard the boat began a two way conversation with the pilot of the plane.  They talked about the weather, etc. and then the pilot did a couple takeoffs and landings along each side of the boat to demonstrate the aircraft capabilities. Here are several videos of float plane in action … take your pick:  https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=float+plane+chena+river+fairbanks+alaska&qpvt=float+plane+chena+river+fairbanks+alaska&FORM=VDRE and enjoy the ride.

Continuing our sedate cruise we stopped along side a home with a bunch of barking dogs!  This was the TRAIL BREAKER KENNELS that was started by a woman named Susan Butcher and her husband David Monson.  These folks were dog mushers / racers.  Susan passed away at age 51 in 2006 and this kennel is continued by her husband and two daughters. When we stopped,Tekla (one of her daughters) told us a bit about her remarkable mom and the kennel. She explained how the dogs are raised with love and affection, and that they begin learning skills very early. While she was talking to us, one of her assistants was playing with some 6 – 8 puppies that she said were 5 weeks old.
The pups were playing / learning to follow a leader and to overcome obstacles.  In this case, they were climbing over logs. This would be a “dream job” if you loved playing with that many squirming, climbing, kissing puppies!!  Please take a few minutes to meet Susan Butcher and discover what a persevering woman she was:  http://www.themarkofaleader.com/susan-butcher-champion-musher/ You’ll find several videos here, but the second one “playing with the puppies” is perhaps my favorite: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=trail+breaker+kennel+videos&qpvt=trail+breaker+kennel+videos&FORM=VDRE

I was thoroughly (and very favorably) impressed with the way the river tour attractions were presented.  Our guide on the boat was able to easily carry on a conversation with the folk on shore via radio headsets when we stopped at each attraction.  The thing that really impressed us was this steamboat excursion wasn’t just “touristy” but was actually well presented and quite educational. We passed a herd of reindeer or caribou and marveled at their impressive racks.  We did learn the difference between reindeer and caribou.  Are you ready ?? … wait for it !! … “only reindeer can fly!” lol!

The boat paused at the confluence of the Tenana and Chena rivers while our announcer pointed out that the Tenana River was a “glacier sourced” river and that the Chena was not.  The Tenana water was cloudy from silt from the glacier. (It may also be spelled correctly as “Tanana”) What you are seeing here is the glacial silt suspended in the water (appears white in the video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CG15aib0gzQ

At another stop along the river, we disembarked at the Athabascan Indian Cultural display.  This stop proved to be very informative and the young people at the display were especially delightful and both were very well spoken and knowledgeable about their material.  This site explains about the Athabascans and some of the efforts being used today to retain their heritage and culture:  http://www.explorenorth.com/library/aktravel/bl-atha.htm The young man was a rising junior in high school and the young lady will be a freshman in Arizona this fall.  The boy is full blood Athabascan and the girl is half Athabascan and half Navaho.   We were able to speak to them individually and they were both friendly kids.  Let me share this site with you:
https://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g60826-d255215-i160347601-Riverboat_Discovery-Fairbanks_Alaska.html.  This day’s experiences will be highlights in  our memories.

After we returned to the hotel … tired but very happy with the day’s activities … Carol and our friends walked some nine blocks to the Golden Heart Plaza. There she found a Malcolm Alexander statue of “the Unknown First Family”  … “a monument to the unwavering spirit of the families past, present, and future who endure in this great land with pride and dignity.”  http://www.explorenorth.com/alaska/images/unknown_first_family-4486.html

I’ll see you tomorrow … I’m tired!!
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PostSubject: Re: September 2017   Sun Oct 01, 2017 9:22 pm



RICK:
I would like to see those reindeer! rendeer The trip is going well!


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September 2017
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